He was looking at a life sentence. Now he’s giving others a second chance.

At 38 years old, Dave Durocher was looking at a life sentence. Dave Durocher. All images in this post by Upworthy and Stand Together. He was a self-professed corruptor who’d ruined people’s lives. As a high-level drug dealer, he’d already spent years in prison. After completing a two-year sentence, he immediately went back to selling drugs then was arrested again.  He did a five-year prison sentence that time. Then a six-year sentence. Then a 10-year sentence. Four consecutive prison sentences. His was the story you hear about and would think – “people like that will never change.” And based on Dave’s pattern of behavior, you’d be right. Being incarcerated had become a way of life for Dave. So, he decided …

Escaping homelessness can feel impossible. This shelter’s making it easier.

When you’re homeless, finding a clean place where you feel safe can seem impossible. Homeless shelters used to be nearly identical: they offered temporary shelter for a few hours a night. In most cities, people started lining up for shelters well before dusk. They’d get a meal and a few hours of sleep in a crowded room before being sent back out early in the morning. And shelter for the next night would not be guaranteed. While these types of shelters certainly still exist, they’re no longer the only option. In fact, more and more city governments are changing the way they think about fighting homelessness, moving away from a model where temporary shelter is seen as a solution to …

This group is bringing clean clothes to anyone who needs them, one laundromat at a time.

It all started with a man named T-Bone and a simple desire. 25 cents is one way it starts…. www.laundrylove.org Posted by Laundry Love on Thursday, December 18, 2014 His name was Eric, but he was T-Bone to the people he knew and liked. Greg Russinger met him in 2003, when he and his friends were working with under-resourced individuals and families in Ventura, California. Russinger remembers asking T-Bone one question: “What would it look like for us to come alongside your life in a way that would matter to you specifically?” “He just said ‘If I had clean clothes, I think people would treat me as a human being,’” Russinger recalls. This lack of clean clothes is sadly all too …

For people in addiction recovery, this unique program offers hope and a healthy community.

A decade ago, Todd and Kaley Jones couldn’t imagine a life without drugs and alcohol. When Kaley left a 9-month inpatient drug treatment program at age 19, she was terrified. She went digging through her makeup bags at home, hoping maybe she had stashed away some drugs so she could numb her fear. No luck. Later, she walked into a 12-step meeting and saw a man wearing a t-shirt that said, “SOBER.” Kaley was mortified. Why wasn’t he embarrassed? Wasn’t it a shameful thing to have had a drug or alcohol problem? But the man, Todd, wasn’t ashamed. “He was happy and he was laughing,” says Kaley, “and he told me about Phoenix.” Kaley and Todd Jones. All photos courtesy …

These men created a support group for fathers. They’re changing what it means to be a dad.

Lance Somerfeld and Matt Schneider never meant to start a movement. They were just two dads taking care of their kids full-time. Lance Somerfeld, his wife, Jessica, and their children, Jake and Jade. Photo courtesy of Lance Somerfeld. The two men met and became friends when they were public school teachers in The Bronx. While they’d already bonded over lesson plans, their love of their work and their students, soon Somerfeld and Schneider were bonding over something else: The fact that they’d become the primary caregivers to their children. “My wife works in insurance in corporate America,” says Somerfeld, who became a stay-at-home dad in 2008. “I had a position where I was teaching, and if I took a childcare …

Solving world hunger is complicated. This brilliant solution is one we haven’t seen yet.

Would you eat food grown on top of a landfill? Your first reaction may not be the right one. Right now, you’re probably feeling a little grossed out. Who could ever imagine that food grown on top of a dump could be edible? But here’s something even more sobering to consider: one in eight Americans struggle with food insecurity. Food deserts are a huge contributor to that statistic. These are remote places (often rural) where local produce isn’t readily available. Few grocery stores sell fresh food there, they don’t have farmer’s markets (something many of us are used to in metropolitan areas) or community vegetable gardens. That’s where Joy Youwakim comes in. She discovered an innovative approach to growing produce …