A million species face extinctionand the threat to humans reminds us we’re all connected.

Throughout our planet’s history, plant and animal species have died out—but not like this. Earth has faced mass extinctions before, but she is now staring down a threat to life that she’s never faced. With a population that has doubled since 1950, a global economy that relies on industrialization and consumerism, and our modern addiction to convenience, the impact humans are having on nature is significant and startling. According to a new report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), about a million plant and animals species are now on the verge of extinction. Nearly 150 authors from 50 nations compiled the report over a period of three years, as 300 contributing authors helped to …

This artist is using tons of plastic garbage to make an urgent point about waste.

Over the past several years, artist Benjamin Von Wong has been on an amazing journey inspiring people to reconsider what they throw away. It started with a trip to Guatemala and an up-close photoshoot of a massive trash heap there, and quickly morphed into a series of projects designed to confront people with various aspects of the world’s waste problem. As an artist, however, he wanted to do it in a way that would get people to look first before he unloaded harrowing facts about waste on them. There’s so much alarmist news out there about what we’re doing to our planet that, frankly, after a while, many of us end up turning off to the problem. Von Wong’s method …

Doctors just used HIV to cure ‘bubble boy’ disease.

Remember the Bubble Boy from the ’70s? One of the more famous cases in medical science, David Vetter was born in 1971 with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which made him extremely vulnerable to germs and disease. So, 20 seconds after he was born, he was put into a sealed, plastic chamber. He remained in there until the age of six at which point he was given a plastic suit designed by NASA so he could move around more freely. Still, a plastic shield separated him from the rest of the world until he died at age 12 after a bone marrow transplant, one of the only other known treatments for the disease, failed. David Vetter in his plastic suit. Photo …

She’s 71 and has literally never felt pain. Her strange condition could help revolutionize pain management.

Jo Cameron has been pain-free all her life — something many might dub a superpower of sorts. While other women struggle with the pain that comes along with childbirth, when Cameron gave birth to her two children, she felt only “a tickle.” Later on in life, she didn’t realize she needed to have her hip replaced until she physically couldn’t walk. She also couldn’t tell she had been burned until others smelled burning flesh, and failed to notice cuts until someone else pointed out blood. Spicy foods — such as Scotch bonnet chili peppers — didn’t set her mouth on fire and instead left her with a “pleasant glow.” Her body also heals more quickly than most, with her injuries …

Solving world hunger is complicated. This brilliant solution is one we haven’t seen yet.

Would you eat food grown on top of a landfill? Your first reaction may not be the right one. Right now, you’re probably feeling a little grossed out. Who could ever imagine that food grown on top of a dump could be edible? But here’s something even more sobering to consider: one in eight Americans struggle with food insecurity. Food deserts are a huge contributor to that statistic. These are remote places (often rural) where local produce isn’t readily available. Few grocery stores sell fresh food there, they don’t have farmer’s markets (something many of us are used to in metropolitan areas) or community vegetable gardens. That’s where Joy Youwakim comes in. She discovered an innovative approach to growing produce …