The curse of Masakado: why Tokyo is still haunted by a malevolent ghost

The tale of the first samurai whose severed head still terrorises Tokyoites today is the story of the city itself A Tokyo bank once opened an account in the name of a man who had been dead for 1,000 years. The bank was a branch of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (now part of MUFG, the largest bank in Japan), which looked out over a neighbouring lot that contained the grave where the man was buried. The bank employees were reportedly instructed not to open any windows to the mans grave, nor to turn their backs on it, even when at their desks; the account was set up to placate him. The figure? Taira no Masakado, a rebellious warrior who was killed in …

These 30 WWII Photos From Japanese Internment Camp Were Censored And Now Everyone Can See Them

In 1941 Pearl Harbour became the scene of a devasting surprise attack by Japanese forces. After decades of being on the edge of war with Japan, the attack pushed the US to join World War II. Not only did this attack took thousands of lives but also triggered racial prejudices towards Japanese-Americans which led to mass ‘evacuation’ of around 1200,000 people. On February 19, 1942, just a couple months after the attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order to deport and incarcerate all Japanese-Americans. Thousands of people, many of whom were born in the US, were forced to abandon their houses, businesses, farms, and possessions. They were loaded into busses with only as many things as they can carry …