Militias, chaos and starvation: Britain 10 years after Brexit

The Queen has fled, Polish workers have been forced out, and violent factions roam a broken land. Writer Jonathan Meades imagines the country The Great Chaos will create The Great Chip Shortage In 2019, older bigots and veteran xenophobes still recalled with pride the successful campaign Boston and the area of Lincolnshire around it waged in the 1960s against nutria. Once these shy, intelligent South American beasts got wind of their fate, they began to escape from the 50 or so farms that had imported them, head for wetlands, breed prolifically, guzzle crops (wheat, beetroot, turnip) and destabilise fen dykes by burrowing into their banks. The situation was later exacerbated by nutria fur falling out of fashion and the farms …

Queer today, gone tomorrow: the fight to save LGBT nightlife

They survived homophobia and Thatcher. But is gentrification now sounding the death knell for gay clubs and pubs? We meet the artists battling to save them On a summers day in 2017, in gardens near the Royal Vauxhall Tavern in London, an unusual drag show took place. A lot of work had gone into the costumes, but these were not of the kind youd expect: there were no rhinestones or wigs. Each performer was wearing an architectural model on their head, and instead of lip-syncing, they were reading out snippets of planning and licensing documents. The models didnt represent buildings of any great distinction, but to members of the audience they were a familiar lineup: the Black Cap, the Joiners …

‘When Im 16, my baby brother will take over’: the rise of the kidfluencer

Tekkerz kid, 10, gets stopped in the street by fans; The McClure twins, five, have 1.7 million Instagram followers. Whats life like as a tiny influencer? Ryan is seven years old and makes a reported $22m (16.8m) a year. His YouTube channel, Tiana, a bubbly 11-year-old toy reviewer from Nottingham (4.4 million subscribers) who has queues of children snaking through shopping centres for meet-and-greets during school holidays. There are hundreds getting more than 100,000 clicks a time, or with six-figure follower counts, such as Super Awesome. But every generation has that same obsessional, cult-like draw towards what is popular, just like the one that wanted to marry Backstreet Boys. Launching children on to platforms that were built for adults is …

Good enough to eat? The toxic truth about modern food

We are now producing and consuming more food than ever, and yet our modern diet is killing us. How can we solve this bittersweet dilemma? Pick a bunch of green grapes, wash it, and put one in your mouth. Feel the grape with your tongue, observe how cold and refreshing it is: the crisp flesh, and the jellylike interior with its mild, sweet flavour. Eating grapes can feel like an old pleasure, untouched by change. The ancient Greeks and Romans loved to eat them, as well as to drink them in the form of wine. The Odyssey describes a ripe and luscious vine, hung thick with grapes. As you pull the next delicious piece of fruit from its stalk, you …

‘Do you ever think about me?’: the children sex tourists leave behind

Their fathers visited the Philippines to buy sex: now a generation of children want to track them down Brigette Sicat will not be going to school today. She sits, knees to chest, in a faded Winnie-the-Pooh T-shirt, on the double mattress that makes up half her home. At night, she curls up here with her grandmother and two cousins, beneath the leaky sheets of corrugated iron that pass for a roof. Today, the monsoon rain is constant and the floor has turned to mud. Brigette, 10, and her 11-year-old cousin, Arianne, arent in school because they have a stomach bug. There is no toilet and no running water, and no means of cooking other than over an open fire. Even …